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Monday August 17, 2009

MARINA:
My mom was here for a quick visit from California. We had a weekend upstate close to Woodstock. Amongst many things we had glorious conversations about language and stand-out novels. Our favorite book to discuss and gloat over is Luis Alberto Urrea’s The Hummingbird’s Daughter. Mami spent three years talking about it and I finally gave in and read it. It is a super special book that I can’t say enough beautiful positive things about.
As a writer and reader, it taught me many things. One is that my mom and I totally pick up on different details as though we didn’t even read the same book. But we did and we can both agree that this novela is worth all of the fuss.
Read it before it is made into a movie. Read more about it here.
"Set just before and after the twentieth century, it is a vibrant landscape, swollen and untamed, populated by rich, educated Dons, Mexican soldiers, valiant revolutionaries, dusty vaqueros, poor Yaqui and Mayo Indians, spiritual healers, and corrupt politicians. With generous detail and good humor, Luis Alberto Urrea gives us a chorus of characters that come together in one brilliant crescendo."

MARINA:

My mom was here for a quick visit from California. We had a weekend upstate close to Woodstock. Amongst many things we had glorious conversations about language and stand-out novels. Our favorite book to discuss and gloat over is Luis Alberto Urrea’s The Hummingbird’s Daughter. Mami spent three years talking about it and I finally gave in and read it. It is a super special book that I can’t say enough beautiful positive things about.

As a writer and reader, it taught me many things. One is that my mom and I totally pick up on different details as though we didn’t even read the same book. But we did and we can both agree that this novela is worth all of the fuss.

Read it before it is made into a movie. Read more about it here.

"Set just before and after the twentieth century, it is a vibrant landscape, swollen and untamed, populated by rich, educated Dons, Mexican soldiers, valiant revolutionaries, dusty vaqueros, poor Yaqui and Mayo Indians, spiritual healers, and corrupt politicians. With generous detail and good humor, Luis Alberto Urrea gives us a chorus of characters that come together in one brilliant crescendo."

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